Raspberry Pi Poster for Elektor

Raspberry Pi posterClick for full-size A3 PDF. Print your own!

A few weeks ago, Interactive Objects was approached by Elektor Magazine to design a poster for the popular Raspberry Pi. For those that don’t know: this is a $35 hackable computer, running Linux. It’s meant for education, but quickly became popular with the maker community. Basically, it’s comparable to the very popular Arduino prototyping platform. While an Arduino can only perform one task at any given time, the Raspberry Pi uses a microprocessor instead of a microcontroller allowing to perform multiple tasks at the same time. Because it runs Linux, any program or code that runs on Linux can (be made to) run on a Raspberry Pi.

The poster provides some basic information about the Pi, like connectors and their functions. It’s also a nice starting guide for people just getting their hands dirty with the device for the first time. After the poster ran in the current issue of Elektor Magazine, we’re now free to distribute it ourselves.

Let us know what you think. Feel free to point others to it and don’t forget to print out a copy for yourself!

Making Of

To give you an idea of how the poster was created: First, we sketched out some ideas. The concept of having a workbench littered with parts and tools came about quite quickly. We liked the idea of the Raspberry Pi being in the middle of the page, actual size, with annotations detailing the working of the product.

Raspi poster making of 2

The basis of the poster is actually a carefully choreographed photograph of my own workbench. Because the text and graphics would be overlaid directly on the photograph, we needed to iterate quite a few times. Make a photo, place it behind the design. Move some tools and parts around. Take another photo. Luckily, an Eye-Fi card handled file-transfers, so we were able to do this really quickly.
Raspi poster making of 1

Some annotations are hand-drawn, like the lines and dimensions. To achieve this, a 1:1 printout was made and sketched over on translucent paper. This was then scanned.

Thanks to Hanneke van den Borne, Rogier Wieland and many others for their feedback. Thanks Elektor Magazine for initiating the poster project and making this possible!

 

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